Become an Electrician: Have a Sexy Job? You Bet!

Become an ElectricianI recently read Derek Singleton’s blog article entitled “Should You Build or Should You Go? The Best States for a Construction Job.”  In it he discusses the main drivers of construction growth and the top jobs in demand, and not to my surprise, he mentions the growing need for electricians more than once.

A career as an electrician is not one many people find overly appealing unless they happen to have family members or friends in the industry. That said it is no surprise that employee referrals are the largest source of new hires at my company, for this exact reason. So what do these people know that the general public often doesn’t? Well let’s peek behind the curtain to see how sexy a job as an electrician can be.

Did you know that electricians: 

  • Have the ability to make $50-70K a year after 4-5 years of training, and up to $100K+ as an experienced superintendent?
  • Have no student loans?
  • Have a skill for life that is needed in any city, state or country for that matter?
  • Are not chained to a computer screen or desk all day?
  • Get to work on many impressive state-of-the-art buildings and facilities?
  • Have the ability to see all parts of the country working on different job sites if they choose?
  • Have a skill that many of their neighbors will be jealous of and come to call them on from time-to-time?

Not every kid will be hired by Google – or wants to be for that matter. The electrical and specialty systems field is often considered the highest in demand of any skilled trade. High school counselors, parents and students need to open their eyes to the lucrative possibility of a career with an in-demand skilled trade. If they are more of the “hands on type,” they might find this career a better fit than a typical office job where they might sit behind a computer all day.

If you are a parent, friend or relative of a high school student, you may want to print off Singleton’s article and show it to him or her. It is clear from the many states with an increase in construction, as Singleton points out, that this career is here to stay. In fact, it is going to be more and more in demand as technology improves and infrastructure is built or updated.