Maximizing Team Participation Results in Project Success

In my role at Faith Technologies, I’m frequently asked the same question by people in different roles throughout the company. They comment on how our jobs run smoothly during the overhead coordination and detailing phases, and then how the installation goes in quickly without many issues. So they want to know, “How do we get that to happen on every project? What’s the key?” There is one thing that I have been able to identify that really solidifies a smooth process: participation.

Now this isn’t just participation by a couple of individuals, on just a few items on the project team; this is participation from the entire team from the beginning to the end of the building information modeling (BIM) and detailing process. By everyone engaging in the process, the team becomes in tune with a multitude of key items including sequence of installation, condensed MEP areas, fabrication opportunities, equipment locations that have moved since design drawings, and so much more.

It’s easy for us to sit back and second guess (or point the finger at others on the team) when a project doesn’t go as planned, but when we all actively participate, we all have proverbial “skin in the game,” which results in team buy-in.

Buy-in is a second key factor we utilize to ensure processes run smoothly on projects. For example, if a virtual design and construction (VDC) detailer makes a major decision on a project without the participation of other team members, that results in buy-in from only that one person, which ultimately results in a decision that might not be as strong as if others were able to share their input.

When that VDC detailer actively teams with a project foreman or superintendent, for example, they create a very effective decision-making duo, which helps deliver projects on time, under budget, and at high quality levels. Now leadership isn’t just bought into the process; they also have buy-in on the layout, the prefabrication assemblies, and the overall game plan of the project. The results can be pretty amazing: fabrication percentage for the project skyrockets, costs go down, primary time goes up, rework goes down, fireworks go off, stars align, angels sing, profits rise… well you get where I’m going with this.

During the next project you work on, ask yourself if you have participation and buy-in from your project team. If you have both factors, I bet you will be amazed at the results the team creates. For us at Faith Technologies, this is our goal for every project.